Tag Archives: logic

The Obituary of Albert Ellis

(originally published in the Obituary Section of The Guardian on August 10, 2007)

Albert Ellis (1913-2007)

Shyness was among the many problems successfully treated by the American psychotherapist Albert Ellis, who has died aged 93. But it was not an affliction that it was wise to bring along to his legendary Friday night workshops, on Manhattan’s Upper East Side: there, patients were hauled up on stage in front of an audience of hundreds, to be rigorously cross-questioned by Ellis, usually with plenty of swearing. “Let me tell you why people are always making you so angry,” he informed a troubled young woman, one warm evening in 2005. “Because they’re screwed up! They’re out of their fucking minds! We’re all out of our fucking minds!”

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Believing Again

Aristotle and Plato engage in philosophical discussion.

To say that the human mind is complex is a vast understatement.  Cognitive functions such as believing, hoping, and desiring are intertwined and interrelated to such an extent that each resists reduction to simple explanation.  The relationships between these processes are at times unilateral, and at times multilateral; parallel at times and perpindicular at others.

Further complicating matters is the nexus which forms between multiple disciplines when  studying the workings of the human mind.  The principles of philosophy, psychology, sociology, logic, and linguistics all come to bear with equally convincing force upon the subject.  Notwithstanding these and other limiting factors, the concept of belief is explored.

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